Carnival of journalism: How do you financially support journalism online?

Gather round, gather round for this month’s Carnival of Journalism, which addresses the timely question of ‘How do you financially support journalism online?’. I’ll be updating this post as the carnival performers put on their outsized business heads and add their peacock-like contributions.

Meanwhile, the carnival is already taking place in Twittersphere – I asked followers to answer in 140 characters or less “What business models could support journalism online?” Responses so far:

I’ve also started a video conversation on Seesmic on the subject – embedded below – on which I’d welcome your thoughts.

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15 thoughts on “Carnival of journalism: How do you financially support journalism online?

  1. Pingback: At the forefront of change « Jason Kristufek’s We Media blog

  2. Karen

    Other than the Wall Street Journal, what online publication has been successful with a paywall? The New York Times tried it with Times Select and it failed. Salon has subscriptions, but you can also read free content.

    The public is used to free information on the Web. (And from television and radio, for that matter.) Do you think the public will be agreeable to suddenly having to pay for something they’ve been getting free up till now?

    The non-profit model makes more sense to me. At least it’s obvious that the publicly-traded model is no longer viable.

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Notes on online business models | The Evolving Newsroom

  4. Aaron

    Right, non-profit makes the most sense.

    Let’s not forget that many papers (like mine, The Clarion-Ledger in Mississippi) are still profitable right now. We’re just not as profitable as we were. Additionally we don’t have expansion debt to pay off, as many other companies do.

    Anyway, If we didn’t have to pay our Gannett shareholders, we’d be in a much better situation.

    Reply
  5. James

    “Let’s not forget that many papers (like mine, The Clarion-Ledger in Mississippi) are still profitable right now. We’re just not as profitable as we were. ”

    An excellent point, often missed.

    There are still profits to be made in print. Just not to combine it with a good online operation and things will look okay.

    Reply
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  7. Pingback: How do you financially support journalism online? « Qwerty2009’s Blog

  8. anz

    my team are making an event, journalist days 2009, theme : citizen journalism:the future of news and information.

    we are looking for possible sponsor. Do you guys know any company who want to support journalism?

    Reply
  9. Amit

    I think that advertisement is a very good way to support journalism online. A website can use one of the numerous services that aupply ads and pay for impressions or for clicks.

    Reply
  10. AdZone

    Quantifying the internet is a very difficult thing. Especially now that there is so much information. Many companies are trying to adopt the approach of pay for content, but im not sure if that would work. I think people are happy to pay for news if it offers something extra.

    Reply
  11. Corrie

    Very hard to determine the exact cost that the internet is having on traditional media and journalism. I think that online journalism is having to transform and adapt to changing trends in social media.

    Reply
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  13. Pingback: Carnival of Journalism: Are we asking the right questions about online revenue models? | Invisible Inkling

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