Monthly Archives: January 2007

Citizen Journalism conference blog

[Keyword: , , , ]. Well, the Citizen Journalism 2007 conference finally took place today. Michael Hill, Trinity Mirror’s Head of Multimedia, spoke of the group’s “garlic bread moment” in converting to the new media age, while blogger Tom Reynolds talked of the power of the blogosphere, as well as its self-regulating nature. Vicky Taylor, the BBC’s Head of Interactivity, outlined the organisation’s approach to user generated content, and the whole was riddled with extensive questioning and debate.

You’ll find some coverage already at Journalism.co.uk (Trinity Mirror launches ultra-local citizen journalism sites), but for more on the speeches take a look at the conference blog at http://citizenjournalism.wordpress.com/ – which I’ll be adding to later – and there’s a conference wiki at http://citizenjournalism.xwiki.com/xwiki/bin/view/Main/WebHome which anyone can contribute to.

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Journalism stories: A multimedia approach

[Keyword: , , , ]. Great series of articles from Mindy McAdams on how to approach interactive storytelling – well worth spending some time on:
Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Labels: interactive storytellingMindy McAdams, ,

 

 

List of guidelines for the BBC’s Web 2.0 project

For some reason I am unable to log in to my Blogger account from work, and so am having to post this via email. So, forgive me if this doesn’t read as smoothly as it could:
 
Quick link for today: Tomski’s list of guidelines for the BBC’s Web 2.0 project. My favourite guideline: “5. Treat the entire web as a creative canvas: don’t restrict your creativity to your own site.”
 

 

Web sites for citizen journalism techniques, tutorials

[Keyword: , , , ]. A list of resources from Danny Sanchez that’s worth browsing if you’re interested in the CJ arena – particularly OurMedia Personal Media Learning Center: “A great resource containing interviews with citizen media pioneers, summaries of media law and more.”

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

PCC to regulate newspaper audio and video

[Keyword: , ]. Journalism.co.uk reports on the move by the PCC to extend its regulation to cover newspaper audio and video, with chairman Sir Christopher Meyer quoted as saying: “We have now persuaded the newspaper and magazine industry of the United Kingdom to agree also the principle of our regulating moving pictures and sound on newspaper’s websites […] we are going to make an announcement, I hope, pretty soon in the next few weeks about exactly what that entails – there are some definitions to be sorted out – but it’s a major step forward, and it’s the first time, I think, that newspapers have voluntarily agreed without outside pressure to extend the remit of regulation through the PCC.”

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

A glossary of online news terms

[Keyword: , ]. The Online Journalism Review have started a potentially very useful glossary of online news terms on their site – and in admirable fashion, have made it a wiki that registered users can edit.

I’ve been in there and said my bit, adding user generated content, crowdsourcing, podcast, vodcast, vlogs, moblogs, photoblogs, CMS, and ‘wiki’ itself – and just to be a pedant, I’ve changed the headings from being simply bold (meaningless), to actually using heading tags (h3, if you must know). I’ll be claiming my percentage when the OJR’s search engine rankings improve.

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

The most popular news video clips online

[Keyword: , , .] How have I missed this before? The Guardian have been featuring a chart of viral news videos since November, with weekly commentary by Jemima Kiss. Well worth bookmarking.

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Newspaper group to train its 1,500 journalists in online skills

[Keyword: , ]. As if proof were needed of the need for online journalism skills in today’s jobs market, HoldTheFrontPage reports that:

“Every journalist working on a Northcliffe newspaper is to be trained to update its accompanying website, putting stories online themselves and learning how to “add value” to articles.
“The group says fully integrated multi-media newsrooms will soon be in operation across its titles, with all of its 1,500 journalists writing for both print and online.”

What’s particularly notable here is the fact that “Sub-editors are also able to rewrite headlines for online stories.” The punny, cryptic headlines that work in print are not always suitable for search engine-optimised, scannable online consumption – but is this what they mean?

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Last chance to book a place on Citizen Journalism 2007

[Keyword: , , , ]. If you want to listen to the BBC’s Head of Interactivity Vicky Taylor, best-selling blogger Tom Reynolds and Trinity Mirror’s Head of Multimedia Michael Hill, you’d better get a move on: booking closes tomorrow for the Citizen Journalism 2007 conference in Birmingham on January 26.

You can book online at MediaSkills.org’s page on the Citizen Journalism conference which will take place next Friday (January 26).

Hope to see you there.

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

CNET, journalists and the whole social net thing

[Keyword: , ]. OK, this is getting eerie. Or perhaps my presentation at the AJE conference in Huddersfield on Friday just happens to take in too many things, but also on my list of Things To Talk About is the vague term of ‘social media’. Hey presto, Jemima Kiss writes a thorough piece on the subject at CommentUnlimited following a forum held by the Association of Online Publishers:

“Daniels outlined CNET’s move towards what Tim O’Reilly (the Web 2.0 guy) described as architected participation. She said CNET’s core mission was to interpret and filter content and that that will remain the same, but that the public have different expectations about the media they use and expect to be able to find and use their voice to participate in the community around it.

“Daniels said: “It may not necessarily be that many people but what they say is incredibly valuable. We want to enable those thought-leading people to engage with the site and give them a platform equal with our editorial team. And if we can get our thought leaders to contribute, the lurkers will benefit more.”

“Daniels was referring to CNET’s new-ish “My CNET” type feature, where users can set up their own profile page, add comments to stories, write their own blog and so on. The most frequent contributors can even get their byline on the front page – which CNET’s own journalists can’t.”

I could go on quoting, but you may as well read the article…

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media