Monthly Archives: November 2006

Future plans £6.7m web investment

[Keyword: , ]. That’s “more than half of its planned new product development spend,” reports Media Week, as the company “seeks to stabilise the business after announcing pre-tax losses of £49m in the last financial year.”

Chief executive Stevie Spring is quoted as saying: “Over the past two years, we spent all of our money on acquisitions to fill in gaps, but they didn’t deliver. It’s clear that our core business needed time and cash and we will be moving staff into our growth areas wherever we can.”

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

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Why multimedia? It forces your competitors to credit you

[Keyword: , ]. Jeff Jarvis has been speaking to Ed Roussel, head of online for the Telegraph, “about the paper-site’s scoop last night on the hiring of BBC Chairman Michael Grade by struggling ITV”, providing an insight into the workings of the newly integrated newspaper:

“Roussel said the Grade story was a model for how it should work on a new
platform that can cut across all media and tools: The story went online at 9:50
p.m. and in no time, they put up audio and video and more content, forcing those
competitors listed above to attribute the news to the Telegraph. Roussel said
there is no more debate about putting stories online first. “

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Pulitzer Prize to embrace Web 2.0 elements

[Keyword: , ]. You don’t get much more establishment than this: Journalism.co.uk reports that “The Pulitzer Prize Board has established new rules allowing newspapers to submit a full array of online material such as databases, interactive graphics, and streaming video for its journalism awards.”

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

The last web news from Press Gazette

[Keyword: , , , ]. Press Gazette published its final issue with plenty of online journalism news – detailed below. Those wanting their fix of news from the excellent Martin Stabe should check out his own blog at http://www.martinstabe.com/blog/ (RSS feed generally only says something like ‘links for 2006-11-22″ but it’s worth clicking through to the site). Here’s those stories:

Web of dispute: Telegraph web supremacy claim dismissed by rivals

Telegraph editor Will Lewis has prompted a statistical battle between national papers after… Read More

Red website a likely priority as Hachette joins digital race

Hachette has become the fourth major consumer publisher this year to announce appointments to a… Read More

Dispatches website to challenge NHS postcode lottery

Channel 4’s Dispatches, is to launch a unique website designed to help viewers challenge the NHS… Read More

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Newspaper readership was declining before the WWW – and didn’t decline any faster after it

[Keyword: , ]. Flicking through Internet Newspapers, a book edited by Xigen Li and collecting a range of articles on the medium I came across an interesting piece of research by Xigen Li and Zhanwei Cao on the ‘Effect of Growing Internet Newspapers on Circulation of U.S. Print Newspapers’. Namely:

“First, the study found circulation of print newspapers has been declining since 1990. There was no difference in circulation changes between the two periods 1990 to 1994 and 1995 to 2000. The later period was marked by the popularity of internet newspapers.”

Sounds like the internet has been a scapegoat for a decline in readership which predates the World Wide Web…

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

The ghettoisation of citizen journalism

[Keyword: , , , ]. The ghettoisation of citizen journalism continues, it seems, with the BBC’s announcement of a news programme based entirely on user-generated material. “Your News, which began a pilot run on Saturday,” reports Journalism.co.uk, “will feature stories, features and video proving most popular with viewers on TV and the internet.” This follows the previously reported announcement by Five News that they will pay for viewers’ clips – with possible plans to put it in a “special section” of the news. I’m told the advert requesting this viewer content closely resembles the advert at the end of You’ve Been Framed.

It would be nice to see user content integrated into the newsgathering process. The danger with these devoted sections and programmes is that citizen journalism becomes trivialised as an “And finally” item, or a “Your Views”-style TV letters page. Interestingly, the Five News website has its citizen journalism right on the front page: a sign that online, at least, the viewers are being taken seriously.

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

‘Social network’ for newspapers to launch next month

[Keyword: , , ]. Journalism.co.uk reports that “A computer platform that allows newspapers to share news and classified advertising will launch early next month.

“US-based CityTools will enable newspaper publishers to create content networks with one another and draw on articles written by members of the public.
“If you spin the CityTools model forward, you can go to your local newspaper website and suddenly, because they have built smart networks and smart relationships with other publishers, you get reliable content. The same kind of
mass but its all relevant to the local readership.”

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media