Monthly Archives: December 2006

YouTube journalism

[Keyword: , , , ]. The LA Times paints a colourful picture of what it describes as the ‘YouTube effect’ of ‘YouTube journalism’:

“A VIDEO SHOWS a line of people trudging up a snow-covered footpath. A shot is heard; the first person in line falls. A voice-over says, “They are killing them like dogs.” Another shot, and another body drops to the ground. A Chinese soldier fires his rifle again. Then a group of soldiers examines the bodies.

“These images were captured in the Himalayas by a member of a mountaineering expedition who claims to have stumbled on the killing. The video first aired on Romanian television, but it only gained worldwide attention when it was posted on YouTube, the video-sharing website. (To view it, go to YouTube.com and type “Tibet, ProTV, China”). Human rights groups say the slain Tibetan refugees included monks, women and children. The Chinese government had claimed the soldiers shot in self-defense after they were attacked by 70 refugees, but the video seems to render that explanation absurd. The U.S. ambassador to China lodged a complaint.”

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

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BBC starts experimental citizen journalism project

[Keyword: , , , ]. Journalism.co.uk reports on a citizen journalism project by the BBC in collaboration with the University of Brighton, Nokia and mobile and web engagement specialist Ymogen “to explore new multi-media story telling ideas using mobile phones and GPS”

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Citizen Journalism conference – now booking online

[Keyword: , , , ]. As promised, MediaSkills.org now has further details of the Citizen Journalism conference planned for January 26, where the BBC’s Vicky Taylor, blogger Tom Reynolds and Trinity Mirror’s Michael Hill will all be speaking on how the media and citizen journalists can better work together.

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Videos of important people talking

[Keyword: , , , ]. Journalism.co.uk recently held its first Readers’ Revolution speaking event with guests Clyde Bentley, associate professor at Missouri School of Journalism, Robin Hamman, BBC blog network producer, and Kevin Anderson, the Guardian’s recently appointed blogging guru. Watch all three in glorious pixelated YouTube video at http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/story3104.shtml

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Canadian citizen journalism website

[Keyword: , , , ]. The editor of Orato.com has emailed me to alert me to their presence. In her own words:

“We are a citizen journalism news Web site based in Vancouver, Canada that aims to put a human face on the news by showcasing vivid, first-person stories from individuals involved in current events.

“We are driven by the belief that writing in the first person is more compelling than traditional journalism because it almost always requires the inclusion of personality. Third-person “he-said-she-said” reporting can mask the truth while making the reporter’s prejudice appear objective.

“We invite ordinary people to tell their stories for free, letting readers vote on their favourites. The highest-rated stories star on the web site’s main pages, netting citizen journalists’ names high ratings and exposure on web search engines.”

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

The arrogance of the traditional newspaper

[Keyword: , , , ]. Jen McClure talks about New York Times chairman and publisher Arthur Sulzberger’s talk about citizen journalism and its effect on the New York Times and traditional media model:

“While Mr. Sulzberger stated that his newspaper and others are increasingly embracing citizen journalism in some way, he seemed to exhibit what I would characterize as arrogance about the unchallenged role of arbiter for the New York Times and the traditional media model in today’s society. He spoke of the NYT pursuing its role the way it has for the last 150 years, and seemed quite comfortable in discounting the knowledge, wisdom and emerging influence of new citizen journalists and the social media movement. This is only a two-minute clip and admittedly his comments could have been taken out of context, but I invite you to check it out and share your thoughts and opinions here. “

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media