Monthly Archives: January 2007

Integrated Newsrooms part 1: The new Telegraph model

[Keyword: , ]. In the first of a promised three-part series, Editors Weblog looks at the new ‘multimedia hub’ newsroom of the Daily Telegraph. Unfortunately, it reads a bit fluffy, complete with a riding-into-the-sunset final paragraph:

“[Rhidian Wynn Davies, Consulting Editor of The Telegraph] says simply “we couldn’t do what we do now in the old structure”. [Edward Roussel, Digital Editor at The Telegraph] explains a little further “Everyone is on one floor and no-one can hide away in their office – there aren’t any. It improves communication. I don’t think anyone would want to go back to how it was. It’s such a dynamic environment now, we have short sharp meetings where decisions are made quickly rather than hour long arranged meetings. Before people didn’t communicate. Now those that aren’t good at communicating are forced to. There is no question that it works a lot better and the quality of the content is higher””

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

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Newspaper Video: Editing and apps

[Keyword: , ]. Andy Dickinson presents his summary of what newspaper video producers need, in terms of software. A second part is also promised which covers freeware/shareware options.

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Online journalism discussion

[Keyword: , ]. The OJR have launched a discussion board on their website around online journalism – looks like a great space to contribute to.

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Students make mobile phone news

[Keyword: , , , ]. News editors, meet the graduate journalists of 2017 (caveat/shameless plug: students on the journalism degree I teach on will have these skills too when they graduate in 2008, but judging from what I hear of online journalism education I’m assuming they’re the exception rather than the rule. Controversial? Well, the beauty of a blog is, you can pull me up if this isn’t the case. So, if you teach on a journalism degree please let me know – via comments – what new media/multimedia skills your students gain. Conversely, if you’re a journalism student, I’d also like to hear what skills you’re gaining and what you think you should be learning. Parenthesis over.)

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Futurology

[Keyword: , ]. I’ve only just caught up with Shane Richmond’s post on the future (or proposed death) of newspapers, following a seminar which suggested in the year 2012 “a typical media group will have a stable of publications: a daily premium news magazine, a free daily paper, a portfolio of websites, an internet television channel and a hyperlocal publishing network.”

Richmond disagrees with the magazine element because “people are less and less inclined to pay for bundles of content” and the RSS-fuelled Daily Me (Frighteningly, Negroponte’s idea is over a decade old) is a “model of media consumption that leads me to believe that media delivery to portable devices (phones, PDAs, electronic readers, flexible displays etc) will, at some stage in the future, supersede ink-on-paper media. I think so, others in the room disagreed.”

I’m of the mind to agree that portable devices and the My Google-style personalised news page will come to dominate news consumption, but that paper will continue to have an important role for the reason that RSS still requires you to select what interests you, whereas paper presents a browsing experience different to the ‘search-and-scan’ approach online. Research shows people are very task-oriented when they go online; a paper is an opportunity to come across stories you wouldn’t otherwise find; and in a local paper context, get an overall picture of what’s happening.

Now, two things may change this: first, social recommendation. When those whose judgement we trust begin to drive our news consumption in a mainstream way, the editor’s role becomes, if not redundant, at least transplanted. Second: screen resolution. When reading a story online or on a portable device becomes as comfortable as reading paper, we may drop the search-and-scan approach.

As for magazines, as I’ve written elsewhere, I think one future for them is as facilitators of virtual communities – a forward thinking magazine publisher will be investing in social recommendation software, forums, reader-editors and expert bloggers right now…

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Trinity Mirror head speaks of “garlic bread moment”

[Keyword: , , , ].

At yesterday’s Citizen Journalism conference Trinity Mirror Head of Multimedia Michael Hill spoke of this being the “garlic bread moment” for the local press – the realisation that new media and citizen journalism “is the future”.

At the same time “Local papers have been doing citizen journalism for over a hundred years – it’s always been about local people.” The battle now is to convince hearts and minds that local people want to consume – and take part in – their news in a different way. This is the “man on the Clapham Omnibus 2.0” who checks the news on their mobile phone, picks up a free newspaper but walks past the newsagent, searches for items of interest online, and relies on bloggers as much as journalists.

“We have to accept that breaking news online has to come first,” he said, a process he intimated some journalists were finding hard to swallow. One had protested: “Why kill the goose that laid the golden egg?” His response? “The goose has got bird flu”.

The process of persuasion has already begun, with ‘Back to Basics’ presentations to Trinity Mirror staff around the country. In the process the company has discovered latent talent in some staff – web savvy journalists; writers who can also edit video – but there is a conscious attempt not to “create islands” of ‘new media teams’ or ‘digital teams’. Hill described the process as being “like turning round an oil tank,” and that some staff would never get it, “but they’ll do what they’re told to do.”

The group have a number of plans for the future. Hill argues that “Local is Web 2.1,” and work is already under way on the first five of a planned 35 ‘micro-sites’ around the country, created by key local people. Blogs are already integral to the newspaper sites, with 34,000 pages being read across the group in the last week alone, and will become more so, as the group looks to tap into the niche publishing of ‘Long Tail’ economics, illustrated most vividly (and to some attendees’ consternation) by the ‘Geordie Dreamer’.

The group are also working on technology to rank stories by the number of people viewing them. “Newsworthiness used to be a judgement of what would sell copies,” he explained, but for the website it is a judgement of what will generate page views.

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

Trinity Mirror head speaks of "garlic bread moment"

[Keyword: , , , ].

At yesterday’s Citizen Journalism conference Trinity Mirror Head of Multimedia Michael Hill spoke of this being the “garlic bread moment” for the local press – the realisation that new media and citizen journalism “is the future”.

At the same time “Local papers have been doing citizen journalism for over a hundred years – it’s always been about local people.” The battle now is to convince hearts and minds that local people want to consume – and take part in – their news in a different way. This is the “man on the Clapham Omnibus 2.0” who checks the news on their mobile phone, picks up a free newspaper but walks past the newsagent, searches for items of interest online, and relies on bloggers as much as journalists.

“We have to accept that breaking news online has to come first,” he said, a process he intimated some journalists were finding hard to swallow. One had protested: “Why kill the goose that laid the golden egg?” His response? “The goose has got bird flu”.

The process of persuasion has already begun, with ‘Back to Basics’ presentations to Trinity Mirror staff around the country. In the process the company has discovered latent talent in some staff – web savvy journalists; writers who can also edit video – but there is a conscious attempt not to “create islands” of ‘new media teams’ or ‘digital teams’. Hill described the process as being “like turning round an oil tank,” and that some staff would never get it, “but they’ll do what they’re told to do.”

The group have a number of plans for the future. Hill argues that “Local is Web 2.1,” and work is already under way on the first five of a planned 35 ‘micro-sites’ around the country, created by key local people. Blogs are already integral to the newspaper sites, with 34,000 pages being read across the group in the last week alone, and will become more so, as the group looks to tap into the niche publishing of ‘Long Tail’ economics, illustrated most vividly (and to some attendees’ consternation) by the ‘Geordie Dreamer’.

The group are also working on technology to rank stories by the number of people viewing them. “Newsworthiness used to be a judgement of what would sell copies,” he explained, but for the website it is a judgement of what will generate page views.

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Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media