Author Archives: Paul Bradshaw

The new edition of the Online Journalism Handbook is now out!

online journalism handbook 2nd edThe second edition of the Online Journalism Handbook has just been published. It’s an almost complete rewrite from the first edition — and 50,000 words longer to boot.

Among the changes are new chapters on writing for social media and chat apps, liveblogging and mobile journalism, and finding leads and sources online.

The chapter on UGC is now focused instead of community and social media management, while the history chapter has been expanded to cover business models and issues facing the future of online journalism.

There’s more to be written about those changes and what they say about online journalism itself. But for now, it’s here!

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Here are 9 email newsletters about data… I think you’ll like at least 4 of them

fairwarning metrics

Sophie Warnes doesn’t just round up data journalism in her emails, she *does* data journalism *about* her emails

As the first group of MA Data Journalism students prepare to start their course this month, I’ve been recommending a number of email newsletters in the field that they should be following — and I thought I should share it here too.

Here, then, are 9 email newsletters about data — if I’ve missed any please let me know. Continue reading

No, I’m not abandoning the term “storytelling”, Alberto — just the opposite (and here’s why)

A digital storyteller looks like this

digital storyteller image by Darren Kuropatwa

Alberto Cairo provoked quite a bit of reaction this week when he tweeted that data journalism and data visualisation ought to abandon the term “storytelling”…

Given that in two weeks I’ll be doing exactly the opposite (my first intake of MA students begin a new module in Narrative at the end of the month) I thought I should add my own reaction. Continue reading

Pete Sherlock on Twitter This is the first piece of content the BBC has shared under a new partnership with the News Media Association

Local publishers — want some data journalism content from the BBC? Local News Partnership applications open again

The BBC’s Local News Partnership — a project to support local and hyperlocal media through access to extra content and staff — has just opened up applications to its second stage.

The ‘Section Two’ stage is focused on contracts for Local Democracy Reporters — but applicants can also now just complete the ‘Section One’ application to receive BBC content. Continue reading

‘Storytelling in the Digital Age’: a free ebook

digital storytelling bookA free short ebook on Storytelling in the Digital Age has been published by Gurpreet Mann (disclosure: Gurpreet is a former student of mine).

I’m clearly going to be biased — but I really like it, particularly because it doesn’t just address the technical challenges of new platforms, but also looks at cultural, commercial and narrative contexts. (The chapter on Tumblr and GIFs is a particular highlight).

Gurpreet wrote the book while a distance learning student on the MA in Online Journalism (now the MA in Multiplatform and Mobile Journalism) as part of an exploration of e-publishing. As well as Amazon (in the US, UK and elsewhere) the book is also available on iBooks and, interestingly as a platform for e-publishing, Academia.edu.

Anchor just created a great audio-to-social-video tool – here are 5 other ways you can create social video from audio

anchor speech recognition

The social audio app Anchor this month launched the latest – and possibly most powerful – addition to its toolset: the ability to convert audio clips into social media-ready videos.

Its incorporation of speech recognition and multiple output formats make it particularly useful – but it isn’t the only tool you can use to create social audio.

Here, then, are 5 other ways to achieve similar effects, from options hidden in dedicated audio recorders to animation tools… Continue reading

Got a new laptop? Here’s how to maintain your privacy from the start

When you get a new laptop – with no cookies on it! – it’s a great opportunity to start afresh and protect your privacy online by default. As I recently got a new laptop here’s what I did as I set it up…

Start from scratch – no importing of settings/applications

Many laptop setup wizards offer the option to import applications, documents or other elements from your existing laptop. I didn’t do this, partly because I didn’t want to bloat my new laptop with anything that wasn’t necessary (and if you use cloud storage then you can download from there anyway), but largely because I wanted to check the settings of each application as I went – this is much easier to do if you’re installing them.

Browsers – install them all

I use at least four different browsers: Safari, Chrome, Firefox and Opera. (You might also want to install Tor for particular use cases, although I’m not going to cover it here).

It’s useful to have different browsers partly because they offer different functionality, but also because it allows you to separate different activities. For example: Continue reading