Monthly Archives: February 2016

Just add JavaScript: use these 3 tools to get instant interactivity

Maria Crosas Batista highlights ways to get started with adding interactivity to your journalism.

This post is for beginners that are learning HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Below are 3 useful websites to embed maps, charts and timelines in your HTML without going crazy. Continue reading

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5 of the best: podcasts about data journalism

Image of podcast on mobile

Image by Carla Pedret©

Podcasts are a great way to listen to stories on the move, be entertained, or keep up with developments in a particular field. However, have you ever thought about using them to learn data journalism?

In this list, I have pulled together some of the best podcasts about data. Some are specifically about data journalism, whereas others approach data from another perspective.
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If the Daily Mail ‘steals’ your visualisation, they’re giving you publishing permission on their site

Nathan Yau has written about the Daily Mail using his data visualisation without permission. It’s not the first time this has happened, nor even the second.

One of my former Telegraph trainees Raziye Akkoc had the same experience when her world map of immigration was embedded in a Daily Mail article.

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Journalists need their own archives. Here’s how to start one

Last week I wrote about the problem with trusting Twitter to keep a public record of all tweets. But it’s not just social networks; we can’t trust any website to keep information on our behalf.

3 recent articles highlight the problem particularly well.

Google loses interest and links rot Continue reading

HuffPost editor Stephen Hull triggers furious reaction over being ‘proud’ not to pay writers

The Huffington Post’s UK editor-in-chief Stephen Hull has provoked a curious backlash on Twitter following an appearance on Radio 4’s Media Show where he was asked why he doesn’t pay writers, writes Alex Iacovangelo

“I love this question,” he replied:

“If I was paying someone to write something because I want it to get advertising, that’s not a real authentic way of presenting copy. 

“When somebody writes something for us, we know it’s real, we know they want to write it. It’s not been forced or paid for. I think that’s something to be proud of.”

Tweeters quickly condemned him for encouraging the tactic during a time when jobs are being cut and budding journalists struggle to financially survive.

Below are some of the tweets, you can read the rest on this link:

(Note: @edcaesar quoted Stephen Hull)