Tag Archives: american press institute

Research: news execs still think they have a monopoly

Statistics from the American Press Institute paint a strong picture of the disconnect between news executives and readers that covers

  • how much content is valued by execs and readers,
  • how easy the two camps think it is to find alternative sources of news; and
  • where readers would go if the website was turned off. That last question shows the biggest disconnect,

As reproduced below, an incredible 75% news execs think switching off their websites will drive people to their newspapers. Readers, however, are saying they would go to another local website, with other prominent alternatives including regional and national websites, TV and radio (note that news execs also feel that ‘local media sites’ will benefit but users disagree): Continue reading

The 100-25-10 Rule

A curious piece of data emerging from a conference at the American Press Institute. It seems that in “nearly all markets, newspaper websites receive 2.5 visits and 10 pageviews for each unique visitor.” Is this a 90-9-1 rule for the newspaper industry?

If you want to make it snappier, multiply by 10, so it becomes: 100 pageviews and 25 visits for every 10 visitors. The 100-25-10 rule.