Tag Archives: user generated content

Making money from journalism: new media business models (A model for the 21st century newsroom pt5)

In the final part of the Model for the 21st Century Newsroom I look at how new media has compounded problems in news organisations’ core business models – and the new business models which it could begin to explore.

Let’s start by looking at the traditional newspaper business model. This has rested on selling, in a broad simplification, three things:

  • Advertising. Put more explicitly: selling readers to advertisers.
  • Selling content to readers, and, twinned with that:
  • Selling the delivery platform to readers – i.e. the paper

Developments in the past few decades have eaten into each of those areas as follows: Continue reading

Citizen Journalism conference blog

[Keyword: , , , ]. Well, the Citizen Journalism 2007 conference finally took place today. Michael Hill, Trinity Mirror’s Head of Multimedia, spoke of the group’s “garlic bread moment” in converting to the new media age, while blogger Tom Reynolds talked of the power of the blogosphere, as well as its self-regulating nature. Vicky Taylor, the BBC’s Head of Interactivity, outlined the organisation’s approach to user generated content, and the whole was riddled with extensive questioning and debate.

You’ll find some coverage already at Journalism.co.uk (Trinity Mirror launches ultra-local citizen journalism sites), but for more on the speeches take a look at the conference blog at http://citizenjournalism.wordpress.com/ – which I’ll be adding to later – and there’s a conference wiki at http://citizenjournalism.xwiki.com/xwiki/bin/view/Main/WebHome which anyone can contribute to.

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media

CNET, journalists and the whole social net thing

[Keyword: , ]. OK, this is getting eerie. Or perhaps my presentation at the AJE conference in Huddersfield on Friday just happens to take in too many things, but also on my list of Things To Talk About is the vague term of ‘social media’. Hey presto, Jemima Kiss writes a thorough piece on the subject at CommentUnlimited following a forum held by the Association of Online Publishers:

“Daniels outlined CNET’s move towards what Tim O’Reilly (the Web 2.0 guy) described as architected participation. She said CNET’s core mission was to interpret and filter content and that that will remain the same, but that the public have different expectations about the media they use and expect to be able to find and use their voice to participate in the community around it.

“Daniels said: “It may not necessarily be that many people but what they say is incredibly valuable. We want to enable those thought-leading people to engage with the site and give them a platform equal with our editorial team. And if we can get our thought leaders to contribute, the lurkers will benefit more.”

“Daniels was referring to CNET’s new-ish “My CNET” type feature, where users can set up their own profile page, add comments to stories, write their own blog and so on. The most frequent contributors can even get their byline on the front page – which CNET’s own journalists can’t.”

I could go on quoting, but you may as well read the article…

Save this story on del.icio.us / Digg this story


Paul Bradshaw lectures on the Journalism degree at UCE Birmingham media department. He writes a number of blogs including the Online Journalism Blog, Interactive PR and Web and New Media