Tag Archives: satire

Forget adblockers – one local newspaper site has inspired a ‘content blocker’

Evening Mail News Blocker Chrome Web Store

The Evening Mail News Blocker is available in the Chrome Web Store

What we need in the adblocking debate is a fresh perspective. Cue Birmingham website Paradise Circus, which has today released a browser extension to get rid of all that pesky journalism slowing down your daily advertising consumption: Continue reading

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'Peer to peer protests' cost the UK economy £4bn – new legislation drafted

Here’s a little something I put together last night to keep myself amused as I watched the “front bench stitch-up” that was the Digital Economy Bill finally get pushed through. It’s just something to keep me sane…

(on a side note, I tried out YouTube’s captioning tool for the first time – the service synchronises perfectly)

Plurk to add 15 new verb options

To those who haven’t been caught up in the fuss, Plurk is a new microblogging service and rival to Twitter. Users are invited to post about what they’re doing using one of 15 verb prefixes, including ‘loves’, ‘is’, ‘thinks’ and ‘shares’. Indeed, it has found itself so successful among disenchanted Twitterati that Plurk has decided to introduce 15 new verb options. These are:

  1. smokes – e.g. “ryanlim smokes another wimpy rollup”. In an attempt to generate revenue, users will be charged a 15% tax on every smoke-Plurk. However, due to health and safety regulations they will not be able to smoke-Plurk indoors.
  2. shouts – for users who accidentally leave caps lock on. e.g. “ryanlim shouts GOING HOME NOW”.
  3. lies – for double-bluffing Plurk users.
  4. lurks – for users who are only there to read other Plurks. Lurk-Plurks are invisible.
  5. waffles – for users who, even with a 140 character limit, still manage to talk too much.
  6. dies – for users who smoke-Plurk 60 times a day.
  7. rhymes – for hip hop artists, poets and drunkards.
  8. impersonates – for identity thieves.
  9. mutters – for users who really don’t want to be heard. mutter-Plurks disappear after two seconds.
  10. reincarnates – depending on a user’s karma score, they may be reincarnated as follows:
    • 0.00 to 21.00: a bee
    • 21.00 to 41.00: a big bee
    • 41.00 to 61.00: a wasp
    • 61.00 to 81.00: a small mammal
    • 81.00 to 100.00: a drummer in a tribute band
  11. steals – Plurk “warns users that valuables are left on Plurk at their own risk”.
  12. denies – for users who have been accused of steal-Plurking and Plurk-lying.
  13. shags – Plurk-porn is a further business model being considered by the founders, who promise shag-Plurks will be done tastefully and with great lighting.
  14. gloats – for users with inordinately high karma scores
  15. leaves – for Plurkers who have decided one Twitter service is enough.


Paul Bradshaw

Something for the weekend: Comiqs

Last week I introduced the ‘Something for the weekend’ feature where I post a link to an online tool which has potential journalistic applications.

This week’s tool is Comiqs,

“a service that lets our users create and share their comic-style stories with the community. We aim to provide our users with easy to use tools that transforms their most cherished and most memorable photographs into something fun. We also aim to build to build a fun and light-hearted community where people can hang out to have a laugh or two.”

Now there’s a rich history of comic strips and graphics in newspapers. Satirical cartoons are an obvious application of this.

Could Comiqs introduce a user generated element to that too?

The site already has a News and Politics section, while ‘People and Personalities‘ also has potential for satirical content. But the other categories bear looking at too. Life story and How to and tutorials have clear magazine equivalents.

There’s a lot of crap as always with UGC, but categories like ‘top rated’, ‘most viewed/discussed’ etc. should help filter through.

The site could also act as a platform for a news site’s readers – give them an image to download and point them to Comiqs to create the caption.

Some obvious problems: no RSS feeds; no way of knowing what language something is in before you click or search.

But lots of potential. Any ideas?