Tag Archives: Scraping for Journalists

It’s finished! Scraping for Journalists now complete (for now)

Scraping for Journalists book

Last night I published the final chapter of my first ebook: Scraping for Journalists. Since I started publishing it in July, over 40 ‘versions’ of the book have been uploaded to Leanpub, a platform that allows users to receive updates as a book develops – but more importantly, to input into its development.

I’ve been amazed at the consistent interest in the book – last week it passed 500 readers: 400 more than I ever expected to download it. Their comments have directly shaped, and in some cases been reproduced in, the book – something I expect to continue (I plan to continue to update it).

As a result I’ve become a huge fan of this form of ebook publishing, and plan to do a lot more with it (some hints here and here). The format combines the best qualities of traditional book publishing with those of blogging and social media (there’s a Facebook page too).

Meanwhile, there’s still more to do with Scraping for Journalists: publishing to other platforms and in other languages for starters… If you’re interested in translating the book into another language, please get in touch.

 

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It’s finished! Scraping for Journalists now complete (for now)

Scraping for Journalists book

Last night I published the final chapter of my first ebook: Scraping for Journalists. Since I started publishing it in July, over 40 ‘versions’ of the book have been uploaded to Leanpub, a platform that allows users to receive updates as a book develops – but more importantly, to input into its development.

I’ve been amazed at the consistent interest in the book – last week it passed 500 readers: 400 more than I ever expected to download it. Their comments have directly shaped, and in some cases been reproduced in, the book – something I expect to continue (I plan to continue to update it).

As a result I’ve become a huge fan of this form of ebook publishing, and plan to do a lot more with it (some hints here and here). The format combines the best qualities of traditional book publishing with those of blogging and social media (there’s a Facebook page too).

Meanwhile, there’s still more to do with Scraping for Journalists: publishing to other platforms and in other languages for starters… If you’re interested in translating the book into another language, please get in touch.

Scraping using regular expressions in OutWit Hub – part 2: special characters, negative matches and more

Regular Expressions slogan t-shirt

Image by Lasse Havelund

In the second part of this extract from Chapter 10 of Scraping for Journalists I recap the basics before discussing techniques to use in looking for patterns in data, and how regex can deal with non-textual characters such as spaces and carriage returns, special characters such as backslashes, and ‘negative matches’. You can find the first part here.

 

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How-to: Scraping ugly HTML using ‘regular expressions’ in an OutWit Hub scraper

Regular Expressions cartoon on xkcd

Regular Expressions cartoon from xkcd

The following is the first part of an extract from Chapter 10 of Scraping for Journalists. It introduces a particularly useful tool in scraping – regex – which is designed to look for ‘regular expressions’ such as specific words, prefixes or particular types of code. I hope you find it useful. 

This tutorial will show you how to scrape a particularly badly formatted piece of data. In this case, the UK Labour Party’s publication of meetings and dinners with donors and trade union general secretaries.

To do this, you’ll need to install the free scraping tool OutWit Hub. Regex can be used in other tools and programming as well, but this tool is a good way to learn it without knowing any other programming. Continue reading

Scraping for Journalists – ebook out now

My ebook Scraping for Journalists: How to grab data from hundreds of sources, put it in a form you can interrogate – and still hit deadlines is now live.

You can buy it from Leanpub here. Leanpub allows you to publish in installments, so you get an alert every time new content is added and update your version. This means I can adapt and improve the book based on feedback from the people who use it. In other words, it’s agile publishing, which makes for a better book. (Also, I can publish at a Codecademy-like weekly pace which suits learning particularly well.)

There’s a Facebook page and a support blog for the book for commenting too.

Meanwhile, here’s a presentation I did at News:Rewired last week which covers some of the ground from the book: