Category Archives: web 2.0

“How do I embed a map/video/infographic/audio/timeline/chart/liveblog on WordPress?” Everything you need to know

wordpress logo

Every year one of the questions most frequently asked by journalism students is “How do I embed a map/chart/infographic/liveblog/video/audio/gallery/tweet/document in a WordPress site?”

Here is a comprehensive overview of what is and is not possible in terms of embedding, and what you should do if you cannot embed. Continue reading

11 charts that illustrate how you can use Twittercounter to check your impact on social media as a journalist

twittercounter

Last year I decided to require my students to submit analytics as part of all their online journalism work. One of the tools that I recommended was Twittercounter.

The free version of Twittercounter does something very simple: it shows you a chart comparing two of three metrics: your followers, your volume of tweets, or the number of people you are following.

It’s not completely accurate, but its simplicity does something very important: it focuses your attention on whether your use of social media has any impact, on one metric at least: the size of your audience.

Of course followers is only one metric – I’ll write in a future post about other metrics and other ways of measuring those – but the ease with which Twittercounter works makes it as good a place as any for aspiring students to begin exploring the importance of measurement in modern journalism.

By way of example, here are 11 charts which show how a simple tool like Twittercounter can illustrate what you’re going right as a journalist – and where you can improve. Continue reading

YouTube advice from Anna Gardner, Lily Pebbles and Hannah Witton (and tips playlist)

youtubers Hannah Witton, Lilly Pebbles, Anna Gardner

YouTubers: L-R: Anna Gardner, Lily Pebbles and Hannah Witton

The highlight of this week’s Rethink Media conference in Birmingham was undoubtedly the panel on YouTube, chaired by Hannah Witton with Anna Gardner and Lily Pebbles.

It was very much in the YouTube genre: a breezy and chatty affair which managed to sneak in mentions of MCNs and CPMs alongside references to the importance of being unique and personal.

Keep doing it – for years

Dedication and persistence was very much a recurring piece of advice from all three panelists. “There is no magic formula, just be consistent,” said Lily Pebbles. “Don’t take your foot off the pedal.” Continue reading

How to: embed images in ‘tweet this’ links

This is the third in a series of posts introducing HTML. The first part tackled making a ‘Tweet this’ link in a blog post, and the second introduced Twitter’s Web Intents sort-of-API. If you haven’t read those, you might find it easier to start there.

You can also get all four tutorials in a small ebook.

Sharelines

Stage 3: Adding an embedded image to a ‘Tweet this’ tweet

It’s widely known in the news industry that adding an image to a tweet can make a big difference in terms of how many times that tweet is retweeted. In fact, Twitter say it’s the single biggest factor.

Chart: tweets with images are 27 percent more likely to be retweeted

Chart: tweets with images are 27 percent more likely to be retweeted. Tweet this image

But adding an image to a ‘tweet this’ link isn’t as easy as you might expect.

The obvious way to do this, for example, would be to add an image link to your tweet – but Twitter will show that as a link, not an image.

Unless you use a particular type of image URL.

Finding the right Twitter image URL

This particular image URL is one generated by Twitter itself, after someone has tweeted the image.

Assuming no one has already done so, then, you’ll need to start by tweeting the image yourself.

Once you’ve done that, open the tweet. You can normally do this by clicking on the date or time next to it (for example “Jan 27″ or “1d” or “2h”).

The tweet URL will look something like https://twitter.com/paulbradshaw/status/560171610309926913.

It is important to note that this image has two URLs. One begins with pbs.twimg.com and another begins with pic.twitter.com. Only the second will be embedded when tweeted – this is the one you need.

If you right-click on the image, for example, to ‘Copy image URL’ you will get the wrong type of URL – the one beginning with pbs.twimg.com. Do not copy that link

Instead, while still on the tweet page, you need to click again on the image. This should bring up the tweet once more – only this time with the pic.twitter.com URL visible. Copy this link to use later.

If you cannot see the pic.twitter URL then try right-clicking on the tweet and selecting View source (or similar). Use CTRL+F to search for pic.twitter and you should be able to find the URL there.

Adding your image URL to the ‘tweet this’ link

From this point you can just follow the steps in the first post in this series only making sure to add the pic.twitter URL in the text= parameter along with any quote – and a space of course.

But I’ll recap them quickly here:
1. Create a URL beginning https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?text= and add whatever text you want to appear in the tweet at the end of this URL. Then include a space and the link to the image that you copied.
2. Press Enter. A Twitter box should appear in the browser with the text you specified, and the link too. (Make sure you’re logged in)
3. The URL will have changed slightly, to replace spaces and other awkward characters. Copy that URL.
4. In your post, switch to HTML (Text) view and link a relevant phrase (like ‘Tweet this image’) by putting <a href="` - then your URL - then `" target="_blank"> before it, and </a> after it.
5. Preview the post and test the new link.

If you have any problems go back through the previous post’s more detailed instructions.

A good place to put your ‘Tweet this image’ link is in the caption to the image itself. You can see an example of this above, or on this post.

In the final part of this series of tutorials I’ll be covering how to style your ‘tweet this’ links so they stand out more – and learn about CSS in the process.

How-to: learn about APIs while making tweetable quotes

This is the second in a series of tutorials introducing HTML, CSS and APIs. You should probably start with the first one, here.

You can also get all four tutorials in a small ebook.

Sharelines

In the previous post I outlined how to create a ‘Tweet this’ link using HTML to open a new Twitter window containing any text you liked. In this post I’ll outline how to add links, hashtags and @names to that tweet – and along the way find out a bit about APIs. Continue reading

2 quotes you need to read about Facebook’s video moves

From John Herrman yesterday:

“What the shift to Facebook video means is that Facebook is more interested in hosting the things media companies make than just spreading them, that it views links to outside pages as a problem to be solved, and that it sees Facebook-hosted video as an example of the solution. A company that uploads its videos to Facebook is not the publisher of those videos. At best, it produced them. Continue reading