Watch: why every publisher should switch to HTTPS (and you should too)

This video, from this year’s Google I/O conference, is one of the best explanations I’ve seen on HTTPS with regard to publishers.

It’s worth watching for five minutes or so to get an insight into why HTTPS is so important not just in protecting users, but also in protecting your own reputation.

HTTPS protects users because it prevents others from seeing what sites they visited before and after yours, and what pages they’re looking at on your site.

Imagine a whistleblower checking your site or profile out, or indeed one of your own journalists visiting it using hotel or coffee shop wifi, and you have an idea what I mean.

But HTTPS also prevents hackers from impersonating your site in order to collect user data. I imagine most publishers will be more concerned with their customers than their sources.

For journalists who suddenly realise that their web browsing is public information, I recommend the browser plugin HTTPS Everywhere, which turns on HTTPS by default (where sites support it) in Chrome, Firefox, Firefox on Android, or Opera.

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5 thoughts on “Watch: why every publisher should switch to HTTPS (and you should too)

  1. Tom

    I recommend HTTPS Everywhere too, but we should make clear that it can only switch on HTTPS by default on websites which are known to support it. Most of your web browsing (including reading the venerable onlinejournalismblog.com) will remain unprotected as most sites don’t support HTTPS.

    Reply
    1. Paul Bradshaw Post author

      Yes, a good point. I am already looking into returning to a self-hosted option for that reason (I moved back to WordPress.com after repeated hacking attacks via my web hosts)

      Reply
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