Journalism tool: Clammr, the Vine for audio

Clammr screenshot

Image: screenshot from Clammr

By Alex Iacovangelo

You probably already have your favourite audio recorder and editor but Clammr offers something new: a way to highlight the best bits of your podcast to help it stand out on social media.

Clammr allows you to select up to 24 seconds of a podcast or interview and post that clip on social media with a direct link to the original to attract listeners. Continue reading

What journalists need to know to fly a drone

Some of the drones that BBC team brought to the session (Photo: Barbara Maseda)

Some of the drones that BBC team brought to the session (Photo: Barbara Maseda)

Drones – also called unmanned aerial systems (UASs) – can provide spectacular views for TV or online video production which would otherwise be unobtainable. When members of a BBC team specially trained to use drones explained in a special BBC Academy Fusion session what factors journalists should take into account when using drones, Online Journalism masters students Carla Pedret and Barbara Maseda (photos) went along. Here are their tips: Continue reading

Online audio tool Anchor: micro-podcasting or public conversations?

Anchor is a new app which allows you to record – and, crucially, reply to – audio from your mobile phone.

Described as ‘audio blogging’ or collaborative podcasting, the tool aims to ride a fresh wave of interest in audio. And it has a lot of potential. We’ve been here before with Audioboo, but Anchor has some key differences. Continue reading

11 FOI tips and other highlights from ‘FOIA Without the Lawyer’

FOIA Without the Lawyer

This was first posted on the Help Me Investigate blog a couple years ago. I thought it was about time I should cross-post it here also.

A natural companion to Heather Brooke’s introductory Your Right To Know, FOIA Without the Lawyer addresses the challenges that come after the FOI is submitted: the niggling exemptions and excuses used by public bodies to avoid supplying information requested under the Act. Continue reading

How and why to save politicians’ (and your own) tweets before they are deleted

Headline: Twitter Shuts Down Services That Tracked Politicians’ Deleted Tweets In 30 Countries

In August 2015 Twitter shut down a number of ‘deleted tweets’ archives. Image: TechCrunch

If you rely on Twitter or other social media services to act as a record of history, a series of incidents over the past six months should make you think again – and take control. Continue reading

5 great data visualisation pieces from outside the newsroom

Some of the most interesting examples of journalistic data visualisation come not from newsrooms, but from creative agencies or companies. In a post first published on her datavis blog Dinfografia, Maria Crosas Batista outlines 5 of the best examples:

1. The Refugee Project

The Refugee Project GIF

Interactive map designed by Hyperakt & Ekene Ijeoma about refugees’ migrations since 1975. It includes historical explanations of some large movements and events to contextualise them. Continue reading

Twitter’s algorithm changes make it key that journalists take control

For some time now Twitter has been flirting with abandoning the reverse-chronological ordering that attracted so many journalists to the service.

Having already introduced “While you were away…” tweets a year ago, and the curated “Moments” storylines 4 months ago, the suggestion is that it may finally be ready to make the leap to a Facebook-style “what we think you’ll like” timeline.

This may be initially opt-in, but then so, once upon a time, was Facebook’s algorithm.

I’m not one of those old users who are inevitably crying about the death of Twitter. We all change as we get older, and Twitter is no exception: once an always-on special companion, now it is a more occasional big crowd encounter. Continue reading