Tag Archives: video

How journalism has changed – Guardian ‘3 pigs’ video says it better than anything

There’s something almost seminal about this video promoting The Guardian’s ‘open journalism’. I’m not sure whether it’s the unusually honest acknowledgement that news is more complicated than it is often presented; the way that the video itself plays with our preconceptions, drawing attention to them in the process; or the portrayal of a production process in which non-journalists are a vital part.

I lie, of course: it’s all of those things. It’s an image of journalism utterly different from how it presented itself in the 20th century, different – if we’re honest – from the image in most journalists’, and most journalism students’, minds.

I expect I’ll be showing this a lot. Watch it.

[flv:http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/2012/2/29/120229ThreeLittlePigs-16×9.mp4 autoplay=’false’]

PS: If you have another 3 minutes, here’s Alan Rusbridger giving a slightly less dramatised angle on the same topic:

[flv:http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/2012/2/29/120229OpenAlanRusbridger-16×9.mp4%5D

…And then move on to these videos linked from this page on how to get involved: from head of news Ian Katz:

[flv:http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/2012/2/29/120229OpenIanKatzEdit-16×9.mp4%5D

…and on sports journalism:

[flv:http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/2012/2/29/120229OpenSeanIngleEdit-16×9.mp4%5D

…and culture reporting:

[flv:http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/2012/2/29/120229OpenCatherineSEdit-16×9.mp4%5D

…and comment:

[flv:http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/2012/2/29/120229OpenBeckyGardinerEdit-16×9.mp4%5D

Video: Heather Brooke’s tips on investigating, and using the FOI and Data Protection Acts

The following 3 videos first appeared on the Help Me Investigate blog, Help Me Investigate: Health and Help Me Investigate: Welfare. I thought I’d collect them together here too. As always, these are published under a Creative Commons licence, so you are welcome to re-use, edit and combine with other video, with attribution (and a link!).

First, Heather Brooke’s tips for starting to investigate public bodies:

Her advice on investigating health, welfare and crime:

And on using the Data Protection Act:

VIDEO from the Global Investigative Journalism Conference

Global Investigative Journalism Conference logo

At the Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Kiev earlier this year I interviewed four individuals whose work I admire: Stephen Grey (talking about internet security for journalists), Luuk Sengers and Mark Lee Hunter (on organising your investigation), and Bo Elkjaer (on investigating networks).

I’ve been publishing these videos individually on the Help Me Investigate blog, but thought I would cross-publish them as a group here.

Here’s Mark Lee Hunter with his tips on gathering information before speaking to sources:

Stephen Grey on internet security considerations for journalists:

Luuk Sengers on organising your investigation:

And Bo Elkjaer on how he used computer technology to follow the money through network analysis:

VIDEO: Tim Ireland on the importance of networks in SEO

Last month I invited Tim Ireland to take questions from students at City University about his experiences in SEO and related issues. One particular section, when he spoke of the role of networks in the legend of Paul Revere, and the significance of the Daily Mail’s false Amanda Knox report, struck me as particularly interesting, so I’m republishing it here.

The video is Creative Commons licensed – feel free to remix it with other video.

VIDEO: Advice for investigative journalists, from the Balkan Investigative Reporters Network Summer School

In September I spoke at the Balkan Investigative Reporters Network (BIRN) Summer School in Croatia. I took the opportunity to film brief interviews with 4 journalists on their tips for investigating companies, bribery and corruption, and finding and analysing data and experts.

These were originally published on the Help Me Investigate blog, but I’m cross-posting them all here for those who don’t follow that.

As always these videos are published under a Creative Commons licence, so you are free to re-edit the material or add it to other work, with attribution. (In fact, these videos were actually re-edited from the original uploads on my own YouTube account – adding simple titles and re-publishing on the Help Me Investigate YouTube channel using the YouTube editor).

VIDEO: Sunny Hundal’s tips for bloggers

Sunny Hundal is the publisher of the UK political blog Liberal Conspiracy. Two weeks ago I hosted a 30 minute Q&A session between Hundal and students at City University, and also interviewed him briefly myself.

3 video clips of the interview (1-2 minutes each) and one of the Q&A (around 30 minutes) are embedded below. These are also published under a Creative Commons licence so you can remix them if you wish (please let me know if you do).