Tag Archives: apps

I’ve got a new book out — it’s all about Mobile-First Journalism (the clue’s in the title)

Mobile-First Journalism book coverMy new book — Mobile-First Journalism, with Steve Hill — is published this week.

The book tackles various aspects of the new wave of mobile-centred publishing, from “mojo” techniques and creating mobile apps to native content and visual storytelling.

Along the way we also looked at the new critical issues raised by the shift, from strategic decisions involved in platform publishing, to fake news, trolling and verification.

It’s been a timely book — building on my experiences of designing the new MA in Multiplatform and Mobile Journalism at Birmingham City University (with some of the first students’ work inspiring parts of the book) — and fun to write.

I’ll be posting extracts from the book in the coming months…

Advertisements

Filter burst: Read Across The Aisle

Nick Lum

In a new series of interviews, Andrew Brightwell talks to the innovators fighting the polarising force of social media filter bubbles. First up, Read Across The Aisle – an app that monitors the political bias of your reading habits.

“This was a problem created by apps, so it’s natural that it might be solvable by apps.”

Nick Lum is describing his latest venture, Read Across The Aisle, a smartphone app that he hopes will offer its users a way out of their politically partisan echo chambers.

Currently, on KickStarter, Read Across The Aisle promises to do for your politics what Fitbit has done for your health.

By colour-coding the political slant of the news sites you read, it will indicate the potential bias you’re getting from your news. Continue reading

What next? How the news media can respond to losing

A road crossing from high up

The infrastructure is complete. Image by Miroslav Petrasko

You can see the future coming.

Which audio app do I need? 9 tested

In a guest post for OJB (first published here), Gurpreet Mann looks at 9 audio recording apps, with tips from the Google+ group Podcasting Technology Resources.

I road-tested the free versions of mobile audio apps Ferrite, Voice Record Pro, iTalk, AudioCopy, Mixlr, Cogi, VoiceBo, TwistedWave Recorder and Boss Jack Jr. I had 3 criteria when testing the apps:

  • Editing abilities
  • Overall look/design
  • And ease of use and features available on “free” version (exporting, uploading images, etc).

Continue reading

Circa news app shows liveblogging’s rise and rise

Circa news app - image from TechCrunch

Circa news app – image from TechCrunch

Just how dominant can the liveblog format become? In Model for the 21st Century Newsroom Redux I noted how quickly the format has been adopted as a default mode of reporting (for example, how widely the format was being used to report on public sector strikes).

In March 2012 the relaunch of the ITV News website saw the format adopted as the default mode of presentation.

In August The Guardian’s horizontally-navigated Olympics liveblog caught my eye.

Now news app Circa is taking the concept back onto mobile (where most liveblogging starts), and adding a few twists, including push updates. Continue reading

Review: Transcribe – a free browser-based app to make audio transcription easier

Antoinette Siu takes a look at a new free app which promises to make transcribing audio easier.

Transcribing audio is one of the most time-consuming tasks in a journalist’s job. Switching between the audio player and the text editor, rewinding every 20 seconds in, typing frantically to catch every syllable—repeating these steps back and forth, and back and forth… in an age of so much automation, something isn’t quite right.

A new Chrome app tool called Transcribe lets you do all that in one screen. With keyboard shortcuts and an audio file uploader, you can easily go back and forth between your sound and text. Continue reading

New Facebook news apps: bring the news to your users, or invite users to your news?

There’s a salient quote in Journalism.co.uk’s report on Facebook’s  “new class of news apps” launched today:

“As we worked with different news organisations there were two camps: people that wanted to bring the social experience onto their sites, like Yahoo [News] and the Independent; and those that wanted the social news experience on Facebook, like Guardian, the Washington Post and the Daily,” director of Facebook’s platform partnerships Christian Hernandez told Journalism.co.uk.

So which is better? An initial play with the apps of The Independent and The Guardian appears to demonstrate the difference well. Here, for example, is the Facebook app widget as it appears on The Independent – or rather, as it almost appears: various other editorial and commercial choices push it onto the fold:

The Independent's new Facebook App in action

The Guardian app, meanwhile, hands over editorial control to the users in a customarily clean design:

Guardian Facebook app

But hold on, what’s this in my news/activity/information overload stream next to The Guardian’s article?

The Guardian news app with Independent stories in the user's news stream

It appears that The Independent app takes the news to the users as well. Continue reading