Tag Archives: liveblogging

A potted history of the last 6 years? How the Online Journalism Handbook changed between 2011 and 2017

A few weeks ago the second edition of the Online Journalism Handbook was published. Two years in the making, it was more than just an update of the first edition — it was an almost complete rewrite (and 50% longer). The changes since that first edition in 2011 highlight just how the industry has changed in those six years — here are just a few of the things that I noticed when I looked back…

Blogging: “If you strike me down, I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine”

In the first edition of the Online Journalism Handbook a whole chapter was devoted to blogging. In the new edition the chapter is gone. Does that mean that blogging is dead? No. It means that ‘blogging’ is now so ubiquitous it has become almost invisible. Continue reading

Advertisements

How do you run a liveblog when you’re shut in a room and not allowed to film or take pictures?

theresa may liveblogCornwall Live‘s coverage of Prime Minister Theresa May’s visit to the area has attracted a lot of attention for the way in which local reporters were denied opportunities to film, take pictures, or ask more than two questions.

“Having covered several high-profile politicians’ and royal visits over the years,” the liveblog reported, “the level of media control here is far and above anything I’ve seen before.”

But it also demonstrates some of the things to consider when planning a liveblog — and how journalists can still manage to make a success of the coverage regardless of PR control-freakery. Continue reading

41 key moments in the history of online journalism {now 45} – have I missed any?

July 7 bombings image

A key moment in recent journalism history: Adam Stacey’s image taken during the July 7 bombings

In the history chapter of the Online Journalism Handbook you will find a timeline of key events in web journalism. While working on the forthcoming second edition I recently revisited and updated the timeline. Below are the 41 key events I have settled on — but have I missed any? Let me know what you think. Continue reading

A simple hyperlocal experiment which shows how publishers can engage with different audiences

liveblog engagement

Civic engagement? Most readers spent more than 30 minutes on the liveblog

On Monday I was involved in a fascinating experiment in civic engagement: 10 hyperlocal blogs all agreed to embed a liveblog of a hustings which would give inhabitants of the largest local authority in Europe an insight into the next council leader.

The liveblog itself was to be maintained by student contributors to the Birmingham Eastside news site. The decision to offer it out to hyperlocal sites across the city seemed obvious – so why aren’t publishers doing this regularly? Continue reading

How The Telegraph liveblog historical anniversaries

Rudolf Heitsch's flamethrower-equipped Dornier 17 on the ground near Shoreham

A public domain image from Laurence’s Battle of Britain liveblog

The Telegraph’s Laurence Dodds has an unusual claim to fame: he has liveblogged not just one, but four, historical anniversaries: the fall of the Berlin Wall; the funeral of Winston Churchill; the anniversary of Waterloo; and the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain.

Anniversary liveblogging is a particularly under-recognised sub-genre which can be enormously successful, and yet there’s very little written about it.

So I asked Laurence what it involved, and what he’s learned from his experiences. Continue reading

How to liveblog a TV debate: lessons from #leadersdebate 

frontpages

Newspaper front pages the morning after the leaders debate. Most newspapers also liveblogged the debate on their websites.

 

Last night saw the leaders of 7 political parties in the UK debate live on TV. But part and parcel of such a debate these days is the ‘second screen’ journalism of liveblogging. In this post I look at how different news organisations approached their own liveblogs, and what you can take from that if you plan to liveblog a debate in the future (for example this one). Continue reading

Circa news app shows liveblogging’s rise and rise

Circa news app - image from TechCrunch

Circa news app – image from TechCrunch

Just how dominant can the liveblog format become? In Model for the 21st Century Newsroom Redux I noted how quickly the format has been adopted as a default mode of reporting (for example, how widely the format was being used to report on public sector strikes).

In March 2012 the relaunch of the ITV News website saw the format adopted as the default mode of presentation.

In August The Guardian’s horizontally-navigated Olympics liveblog caught my eye.

Now news app Circa is taking the concept back onto mobile (where most liveblogging starts), and adding a few twists, including push updates. Continue reading